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New and Featured Books for 10/11/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Mad River by John Sandford

Live By Night by Dennis Lehane

A Working Theory Of Love by Scott Hutchins

Brink Of Chaos by Tim LaHaye and Craig Parshall

Dick Francis’ Bloodline by Felix Francis

A Necessary Evil by Alex Kava

May We Be Foregiven by A. M. Homes

Railsea by China Miéville

This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Díaz

What The Cat Saw by Carolyn Hart

Postcards From The Dead: A Scrapbooking Mystery by Laura Childs

Zoo by James Patterson and Michael Ledwidge

Phantom by Jo Nesbø

A Dangerous Inheritance: A Novel Of Tudor Rivals And The Secret Of The Tower by Alison Weir

Blasphemy: New And Selected Stories by Sherman Alexie

The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker

Redoubt by Mercedes Lackey

Say You’re Sorry by Michael Robotham

The Shadow Girls by Henning Mankell

Red Rain by R. L. Stine

In Sunlight And In Shadow by Mark Helprin

NON-FICTION:

Houses Of Horror by Hans Holzer

Viper Pilot: A Memoir Of Air Combat by Dan Hampton

Red Ink: Inside The High-Stakes Politics Of The Federal Budget by David Wessel

Don’t Know Much About The American Presidents by Kenneth C. Davis

Ike’s Bluff: President Eisenhower’s Secret Battle To Save The World by Evan Thomas

Killing Kennedy: The End Of Camelot by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard

The Fourteenth Day: JFK And The Aftermath Of The Cuban Missile Crisis by David G. Coleman

The Endgame: The Inside Story Of The Struggle For Iraq, From George W. Bush To Barack Obama by Michael R. Gordon and Bernard E. Trainor

Who I Am by Pete Townshend

Mick Jagger by Philip Norman

The John Lennon Letters, edited and with an introduction by Hunter Davies

Luck Or Something Like It: A Memoir by Kenny Rogers

Waging Heavy Peace: A Hippie Dream by Neil Young

Light & Shade: Conversations With Jimmy Page by Brad Tolinski

Kicking & Dreaming: A Story Of Heart, Soul, And Rock & Roll by Ann Wilson and Nancy Wilson with Charles R. Cross

The Energy Bus: Ten Rules To Fuel Your Life, Work, And Team With Positive Energy by Jon Gordon

Living For The City: Migration, Education, And The Rise Of The Black Panther Party In Oakland, California by Donna Jean Murch

My Mother Was Nuts: A Memoir by Penny Marshall

God: A Story Of Revelation by Deepak Chopra

The Good Pope: the Making Of A Saint And The Remaking Of The Church – The Story Of John XXIII And Vatican II by Greg Tobin

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

09/21/12.

09/06/12.

08/23/12.

08/15/12.

08/09/12.

08/02/12.

New and Featured Books for Kids/Juvenile Readers for 07/25/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for younger and juvenile readers added to our library collection…

EASY READING:

My New Sandbox by Donna Jakob and illustrated by Julia Gorton

Ready For Anything! by Keiko Kasza

Adiós, Tricycle by Susan Middleton Elya and illustrated by Elisabeth Schlossberg

Baseball From A To Z by Michael P. Spradlin and illustratedy by Macky Pamintuan

“I Have A Little Problem,” Said The Bear by Heinz Janisch and illustrted by Silke Leffler

Five Little Firefighters by Tom Graham

The Buffalo Are Back by Jean Craighead George with paintings by Wendell Minor

1, 2, 3, Go! by Huy Voun Lee

FICTION:

Big Red by Jim Kjelgaard and illustrated by Bo Kuhn

Ginger Pye by Eleanor Estes

The Home-Run King by Patricia C. McKissack and illustrated by Gordon C. James

Cam Jansen And The Summer Camp Mysteries: A Super Special by David A. Adler and illustrated by Joy Allen

Trolls On Vacation by Alan MacDonald and illustrated by Mark Beech

The Bronze Bow by Elizabeth George Speare

NON-FICTION:

Dance Of The Swan: A Story About Anna Pavlova by Barbara Allman and illustrated by Shelly O. Haas

Ashanti To Zulu: African Traditions by Margaret Musgrove and illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon

Gold Fever: Tales From The California Gold Rush by Rosalyn Schanzer

Letters Home From The Grand Canyon by Lisa Halvorsen

I Why Why: Triceratops Had Horns And Other Questions About Dinosaurs by Rod Theodorou

Yankee Doodle by Mary Ann Hoberman and illustrated by Nadine Bernard Westcott

P Is For Piñata: A Mexico Alphabet by Tony Johnston and illustrated by John Parra

Volcanoes by Claire Llewellyn

Volcano: The Eruption And Healing Of Mount St. Helens by Patricia Lauber

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Please note that books mentioned here could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk, OR call us, OR send us an email at robinsbaselibrary@gmail.com and  we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

07/18/12.

07/03/12.

06/27/12.

06/14/12.

06/07/12.

And for Young Adults:

07/10/12.

04/12/12.

04/03/12.

03/20/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

07/13/12.

06/26/12.

06/21/12.

06/12/12.

Reading material for 03/12/12:

Posted on

Some reading material from around the internet:

Apparently tweets can now be cited as evidence in academic papers.

The massive launch of Mass Effect 3.

RIP Jean Giraud, AKA Moebius.

Wal-Mart debuts their “Great For You” seal.

The “QWERTY Effect” is changing what words mean to us.

How do you ship a horse to the London Olympics?

The picture above is by Jan van der Veken, from here.

NASA would like you to know that the world will not end in 2012.

The youngest female self-made billionaire.

Car breaks down before Consumer Reports can even test it.

A 340 ton boulder turned work of art.

Inside some of the world’s tallest buildings.

Here’s a fascinating radio documentary: “Nuclear Power After Fukushima.”

Penguins fly first class on airplanes.

They’re going to make a movie out of the theft of Nic Cage’s prized Action Comics No.1!

by Yale Stewart, from here.

The 10,000 year plan for Amazon.

Get ready to share even more on Facebook.

Apple has announced the new iPad.

Speaking of which, are Apple’s insanely high profit margins built to last?

The Navy will be testing a new firefighting robot in 2013.

RFID your stuff, then find it with your mobile phone.

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes buys The New Republic.

Why are companies ditching Google maps?

10 of the most powerful female characters in literature.

The review of 1984 that Aldous Huxley sent to George Orwell.

The paranoia of Philip K. Dick.

Audiobooks and the celebrities who were born to read them.

There’s still quite a gender bias in book journalism.

10 essential history books written by women.

The only Game Of Thrones/Song Of Ice And Fire map you’ll ever need.

A few things that Jonathan Franzen actually likes.

The trailer for the return of Community.

Also, check out this mash up Community/The Dark Knight Rises trailer.

And speaking of The Dark Knight Rises: Action figures!

Jennifer Lawrence almost said no to The Hunger Games.

A complete guide to 2012’s TV pilots.

Apparently there’s an R-rated version of Galaxy Quest out there somewhere.

A picture of Peter Dinklage as Wolverine.

A chart that helps explain just how much of “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away” does Star Wars take place.

Speaking of Star Wars: Topher Grace has edited all the prequels into one concise 85 minute long film that is supposedly fairly good.

Your first look at Johnny Depp as Tonto in Gore Verbinksi’s The Lone Ranger adaptation.

by Scott Ferguson, from here.

The many dimensions of Catherine the Great.

Kids found living in abandoned bus.

Fiona Apple reveals her new album title, and it’s 23 words long (as opposed to 90 words).

Disturbing school lunch menus.

What visions of the future do high speed rail lines provide us?

Is this the nicest Taco Bell on the planet?

A 7 year old makes an awesome Rube Goldberg machine.

This will be an interesting week, since it contains both Pi Day and the Ides of March. Beware!

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Previous online reading material:

03/05/12.

02/27/12.

02/20/12.

02/13/12.

02/06/12.

New and Featured Books for Young Adults for 03/06/2012:

Posted on

Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) for Young Adults added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Goddess Of Yesterday by Caroline B. Cooney

Gyakushu! vol. 1, written and illustrated by Dan Hipp

Saint Louis Armstrong Beach by Brenda Woods

Historical fiction about how Hurricane Katrina effects an 11 year old boy, dealing with the struggles of evacuation and the strength of a people determined to survive in their city. The review from Kirkus Reviews sums it up nicely: “A small gem that sparkles with hope, resilience and the Crescent City’s unique, jazz-infused spirit.”

Hooked by Catherine Greenman

The River by Gary Paulsen

Girl Parts by John M. Cusick

Flawless by Sara Shepard

Fallen by Lauren Kate

Nation by Terry Pratchett

Re-Gifters by Mike Carey and illustrated by Sonny Liew and Marc Hempel

Saving Zoë by Alyson Noël

Angry Management by Chris Crutcher

What They Found: Love On 145th Street by Walter Dean Myers

The Demon’s Lexicon by Sarah Rees Brennan

An Abundance Of Katherines by John Green

Another novel from author and vlogger, John Green, and his second book. As I’ve said before, Green is extremely popular with our young adult (and adult) readers, and it’s not hard to understand why when you read one of his books. They’re sweet, but they’re quirky and unique, and they’re smart, and the characters are memorable, especially the characters in this book, which is about a boy with an affinity for girls with the name Katherine, and his friend who accompanies him on a road trip. Check out reviews for the novel done by The Young Folks and The New York Times.

My Boyfriend Is A Monster, vol. 1: I Love Him To Pieces by Evonne Tsang and illustrated by Janina Görrissen

Great tagline: “Can love survive the zombie apocalypse?” This is a fun graphic novel. It’s boy meets girl, and of course they come from two different worlds: she’s a jock, and he’s a nerd. And then the zombie outbreak happens. It’s got horror, romance, and the art by Janina Görrissen is just wonderful. Here’s a review from The Ninja Librarian.

NON-FICTION:

Web Design For Teens by Maneesh Sethi

The Brave Escape Of Edith Wharton by Connie Nordheilm Wooldridge

A fine biography of Edith Wharton, author of books like Ethan Frome and The House Of Mirth, who was born into a priveleged, wealthy New York City family during the Gilded Age, and her escape into a more creative life. Connie Nordheilm Wooldridge‘s book is very interesting in that it focuses much more on the life of Wharton, rather than her works, which makes it very insightful for anyone who’s read her books or is looking to discover them. Check out The New York Times‘ review.

Cool Tech: Gadgets, Games, Robots, And The Digital World by Clive Gifford, with consulting by Mike Goldsmith

How Cool Is This? An Up-Close Inside Look At How Things Work

Tattoos And Secret Societies by Jason Porterfield

The Influencing Machine: Brooke Gladstone On The Media by Brooke Gladstone and illustrated by Josh Neufeld

Brooke Gladstone is a journalist and media analyst, and an expert on trends in the media, and she hosts NPR’s On The Media. She has called this book, a graphic novel illustrated by cartoonist Josh Neufeld to be a “a treatise on the relationship between us and the news media,” and the story utilizes an illustrated version of Gladstone herself taking the reader through the history of the American press. It is a very interesting book. You can find reviews at Slate and NPR, and an interview with Gladstone at Newsarama. Check out the trailer below:

Wild At Heart: The Story Of Joy Adamson, Author Of Born Free by Anne E. Neimark

Come Back To Afghanistan: A California Teenager’s Story by Said Hyder Akbar

The Big Idea Science Book: The Incredible Concepts That Show How Science Works In The World

Georgia O’Keeffe: The “Widenss And Wonder” Of Her World by Beverly Gherman

Wheels Of Change: How Women Rode The Bicycle To Freedom (With A Few Flat Tires Along The Way) by Sue Macy

Very interesting. Features a brief memoir section of author Sue Macy‘s childhood reminiscences of bicycle riding and then moves into a very informative history of the bicycle and how women were able to use it as innovative technology to cycle out of repressive conditions in the past and closer to independence. There’s also a nice foreword by Leah Missback Day, the founder of World Bicycle Relief. Check out reviews from Booklist and Read Kiddo Read.

Pre-Algebra And Algebra Smarts! by Lucille Caron and Philip M. St. Jacques

Celebrating A Quinceanera: A Latina’s 15th Birthday Celebration by Diane Hoyt-Goldsmith and with photographs by Lawrence Migdale

Tricky Mindtrap Puzzles: Challenges The Way You Think & See by Detective Shadow

Raggin’ Jazzin’ Rockin': A History Of American Musical Instrument Makers by Susan VanHecke

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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And please don’t forget to check back here tomorrow to find out more about our Survey/Trivia contest.

And for info on other future contests we’ll be doing, you can always check out our CONTESTS page.

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Previous New/Featured books for Adults:

03/01/12.

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

And for Young Adults:

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

01/31/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

02/16/12.

01/28/12.

Reading material for 02/20/12:

Posted on

Some reading material from around the internet:

NASA unveils stunning models of future aircraft designs.

Take a ride in this absolutely terrifying elevator.

Tim Tebow asked to Military Ball by Louisiana airwoman.

The FBI might cut off the internet for millions of people on March 8th.

The image above is by celebrated illustrator Charles Santore.

Brand new Angry Birds game, Angry Birds: Space, to debut in March!

Target is not only extremely good at data mining, but they’re keeping an eye on you.

Man suffers heart attack at Heart Attack Grill!

Supreme Court Justice robbed by machete-wielding intruder.

Catch a glimpse of Google’s luxurious California HQ.

Apple considering a smaller tablet.

Also, Apple’s new operating system aims to knit its products together more closely.

The insidious evils of “Like” culture.

7 horrifying historical origins of famous corporate logos.

The future of high tech healthcare, and its challenges.

Reviewing Pinterest, the newest social media site.

The “Undue Weight” of Truth on Wikipedia.

Does anyone really care about online privacy?

How companies learn your secrets.

On this day in history:

In 1872 the Metropolitan Museum of Art opened in New York city.

In 1933 the 21st Amendment, which will end Prohibition in the United States, is proposed by Congress.

In 1935 Caroline Mikkelson becomes the first woman to set foot on Antarctica.

In 1962, while aboard the Mercury spacecraft entitled Friendship 7, astronaut John Glenn becomes the first American to orbit the Earth.

In 1998 figure skater Tara Lipinski becomes the youngest individual gold medalist at the Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan.

In 2003 there’s an accident with the pyrotechnics display at a White Snake concert in a small club in West Warwick, Rhode Island and 100 people are killed and 200 more are seriously injured.

In 2009 the World Day of Social Justice is officially established and recognized each year. The goal of the World Day of Social Justice is to recognize the need to promote efforts to tackle issues such as poverty, exclusion, and unemployment all over the world.

Famous births: Rihanna in 1988, T. J. Slaughter in 1977, Brent Gretzky (Wayne’s little brother) in 1972, Kurt Cobain in 1967, Cindy Crawford in 1966, Anthony Stewart Head in 1954, Patty Hearst in 1954, Gordon Brown in 1951, Ivana Trump in 1949, Sandy Duncan in 1946, Mike Leigh in 1943, Sidney Poitier in 1927, Richard Matheson in 1926, Robert Altman in 1925, Gloria Vanderbilt in 1924, Ansel Adams in 1902.

Famous deaths: William Wallace Lincoln in 1862, Frederick Douglass in 1895, Max Schreck in 1936, Chester Nimitz in 1966, Dick York (the first Darrin Stephens on Bewitched) in 1992, Ferruccio Lamborghini in 1993, Gene Siskel in 1999, Sandra Dee in 2005, Hunter S. Thompson in 2005.

via Awesome People Reading.

The 20 most beautiful bookstores in the world.

Alan Moore sums up everything that is wrong with the entertainment industry.

A crossover between Doctor Who and Star Trek.

William Gibson and the way we understand cities.

Composite sketches of literary characters.

10 tips on writing from David Ogilvy.

Every Bart Simpson chalkboard quote ever.

Zora Neale Hurston’s love spells and rituals to get a man.

Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby adapted as an opera.

An essential postmodern reading list.

from here.

The cast of Game Of Thrones in normal clothes.

A supercut of television shows referencing other television shows.

Michael Bay will return to direct Transformers 4, which will be a reboot. Seriously.

Get ready for the Hannibal Lecter TV show.

Jon Hamm drops more hints about the new season of Mad Men.

10 things from the Hunger Games books that the movie(s) probably can’t pull off.

Billy Bob Thornton is making a road trip movie about his marriage to Angelina Jolie.

Gael Garcia Bernal is the Zorro of the post-apocalyptic future.

Author Kevin J. Anderson will novelize Rush’s new album.

Crystals may be possible in time as well as space.

Butterflies light the way to better thermal imaging.

The stupid things you do online (and how to fix them).

They know now at what time of day that you’re most likely to get an infection.

The inside story of climate scientists under siege.

Phonemes probably can’t reveal the ancient origins of language after all.

Do you think you could have passed Thomas Edison’s job interview test?

Cats as fonts.

Second graders take a field trip to a parking garage.

How to tie your shoes (Hint: you’ve been doing it wrong for a while now).

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Previous online reading material:

02/13/12.

02/06/12.

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

12/19/11.

Reading material for 02/13/12:

Posted on

Some reading material from around the internet:

SeaWorld is being sued… by five of its “enslaved” killer whales.

Teens learn robotics as factories lack skilled workers.

Origami robots that run only on air.

RIP Whitney Houston.

Listen to Whitney Houston’s isolated vocal track from “How Will I Know?”

Sophisticated jewelry heist stumps Chicago cops.

Take a tour of NYC sewers on Valentine’s Day. Seriously.

California’s volcanoes to be monitored more closely.

34% of people aged 25 to 29 years old have moved back home.

The Pentagon to lift some restrictions on women in combat.

Social media explained.

Amazon tries out the brick and mortar approach.

Google might open a store too.

How to improve your odds in online dating.

The FBI file on Steve Jobs.

The man behind the fake Cormac McCarthy twitter account.

Do you want to open up a perpetual, invisible window into your gmail?

Also, men don’t read online dating profiles.

Stephen Fry says that British judges don’t understand twitter.

Arguing for a Zuckerberg tax.

Mad Men: a guide to catching up before season 5, which starts next month.

Also, Thomas Jane was almost Don Draper.

Natalie Portman to join both of Terrence Malick’s upcoming films.

Naomi Watts to play Princess Diana.

Roger Ebert says 3D is killing Hollywood.

It looks like House will be coming to an end in May with the conclusion of its 8th season.

George Lucas says Han never shot first.

Amy Adams to adapt Steven Martin’s An Object Of Beauty.

Anton Corbijn to adapt John Le Carré’s A Most Wanted Man, which will star Phillip Seymour Hoffman.

Navy SEALs moonlight as movie stars.

The trailer for The Bourne Legacy.

In the picture above: 15,000 different books about Abraham Lincoln arranged together to form a three story tower in the lobby of the Ford’s Theater Center for Education and Leadership.

What Dr. Seuss books were really about.

William Gibson on aging futurism.

10 of the greatest kisses in literature.

A neurodevelopmental perspective on A. A. Milne.

The top 10 Batman storylines.

Charles Dickens and Sinclair Lewis.

A list of ridiculous names in Charles Dickens novels (incomplete).

Jeffrey Zaslow, the man who wrote the recent Gabrielle Giffords book and the Chesley “Sully” Sullenberg, died on Friday.

Michael Chabon talks about his new short story.

Books that will change the way you think about love.

This is a very cool site: Better Book Titles.

from here.

How black lights work.

Legacy of nuclear drilling site in Colorado still lingers.

Entire genome of extinct human decoded from fossil.

Can bees make tupperware?

10 things you probably didn’t know about love and sex.

Metaphors trigger the visual parts of your brain.

The psychedelic cult that thrived for nearly 2000 years.

Greek protesters setting Athens aflame.

The world’s tallest hotel is, of course, in Dubai.

Why being sleepy and drunk is great for creativity.

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Previous online reading material:

02/06/12.

01/30/12.

12/27/11.

12/19/11.

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