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Tag Archives: 2012

Teen Read Week 2012.

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Teen Read Week starts in a few weeks, and this year it’s got a very cool theme…

Just perfect for the season, right? We hope you’ll join us for some scary good times.

Reading material for 03/26/12:

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from here.

Some reading material from around the internet:

Amazing new photos of the Titanic.

Starbucks to release their own energy drink.

Rainbow-striped Jello Easter eggs.

Mystery booms in Wisconsin.

Just how big is Wal-Mart?

What you need to know about Mad Men season 5.

A new painting by Van Gogh has been discovered.

A child’s wardrobe that actually leads to Narnia!

from here.

Retina display!

Watch all of Mass Effect 3‘s different endings.

A nice review of Angry Birds Space.

Neil deGrasse Tyson on being a meme.

10 things that are smarter than you’d expect.

Historic photos of female scientists at work.

Social media will probably not democratize the world.

Play the interactive 8-bit Mad Men game.

Watch celebrities read their follower’s meanest tweets.

Young people are losing interest in cars.

Suzanne Collins is Kindle’s best selling author of all time, and 29 of the 100 most highlighted passages on the Kindle come from The Hunger Games trilogy.

Speaking of which: the film version of The Hunger Games opens huge.

Defending the thesaurus.

A previously unreleased Kurt Vonnegut novella was released last week.

How does 1Q84 stack up against Haruki Murakami’s other classic novels?

Famous lost novels.

A list of Irish heroes in Jame Joyce’s Ulysses.

Dreamily eerie Alice In Wonderland drawings.

Robert Louis Stevenson on the books that have inspired him.

via Entertainment Weekly.

A nice Game Of Thrones featurette  to get you caught up for the show’s return on April 1.

Some hilarious audience notes from a 1980s screening of David Cronenberg’s Videodrome.

Could Hawkeye from The Avengers be the world’s worst archer?

This is what Carrie looks like in The Sex And The City prequel.

They’re making a Hannibal Lecter TV show.

Meet the new companion on Doctor Who, and learn some details from the upcoming season.

An oral history of The Sopranos.

Many buyers fooled by The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo‘s DVD joke.

The beginning of the end of HBO?

A bizarre picture from a Chinese dog show.

Why cats can survive falls that would kill any other animals.

How does the brain secrete morality?

A brief guide to pop culture in 1966.

10 great songs from 1966.

Chick-Fil-A threatens the guy who made the “Eat More Kale” t-shirts, he fights back with a Kickstarter documentary.

Cell division humor.

Even Geraldo Rivera’s son is ashamed of his father’s comments, re: Trayvon Martin and hoodies.

Pictures of toddlers being best friends with their dogs.

An impossible font.

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Previous online reading material:

03/12/12.

03/05/12.

02/27/12.

02/20/12.

02/13/12.

Reading material for 03/12/12:

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Some reading material from around the internet:

Apparently tweets can now be cited as evidence in academic papers.

The massive launch of Mass Effect 3.

RIP Jean Giraud, AKA Moebius.

Wal-Mart debuts their “Great For You” seal.

The “QWERTY Effect” is changing what words mean to us.

How do you ship a horse to the London Olympics?

The picture above is by Jan van der Veken, from here.

NASA would like you to know that the world will not end in 2012.

The youngest female self-made billionaire.

Car breaks down before Consumer Reports can even test it.

A 340 ton boulder turned work of art.

Inside some of the world’s tallest buildings.

Here’s a fascinating radio documentary: “Nuclear Power After Fukushima.”

Penguins fly first class on airplanes.

They’re going to make a movie out of the theft of Nic Cage’s prized Action Comics No.1!

by Yale Stewart, from here.

The 10,000 year plan for Amazon.

Get ready to share even more on Facebook.

Apple has announced the new iPad.

Speaking of which, are Apple’s insanely high profit margins built to last?

The Navy will be testing a new firefighting robot in 2013.

RFID your stuff, then find it with your mobile phone.

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes buys The New Republic.

Why are companies ditching Google maps?

10 of the most powerful female characters in literature.

The review of 1984 that Aldous Huxley sent to George Orwell.

The paranoia of Philip K. Dick.

Audiobooks and the celebrities who were born to read them.

There’s still quite a gender bias in book journalism.

10 essential history books written by women.

The only Game Of Thrones/Song Of Ice And Fire map you’ll ever need.

A few things that Jonathan Franzen actually likes.

The trailer for the return of Community.

Also, check out this mash up Community/The Dark Knight Rises trailer.

And speaking of The Dark Knight Rises: Action figures!

Jennifer Lawrence almost said no to The Hunger Games.

A complete guide to 2012’s TV pilots.

Apparently there’s an R-rated version of Galaxy Quest out there somewhere.

A picture of Peter Dinklage as Wolverine.

A chart that helps explain just how much of “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away” does Star Wars take place.

Speaking of Star Wars: Topher Grace has edited all the prequels into one concise 85 minute long film that is supposedly fairly good.

Your first look at Johnny Depp as Tonto in Gore Verbinksi’s The Lone Ranger adaptation.

by Scott Ferguson, from here.

The many dimensions of Catherine the Great.

Kids found living in abandoned bus.

Fiona Apple reveals her new album title, and it’s 23 words long (as opposed to 90 words).

Disturbing school lunch menus.

What visions of the future do high speed rail lines provide us?

Is this the nicest Taco Bell on the planet?

A 7 year old makes an awesome Rube Goldberg machine.

This will be an interesting week, since it contains both Pi Day and the Ides of March. Beware!

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Previous online reading material:

03/05/12.

02/27/12.

02/20/12.

02/13/12.

02/06/12.

New and Featured Books for 03/01/2012:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new books and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

Tigerlily’s Orchid by Ruth Rendell

The Fear Index by Robert Harris

The new thriller from author/journalist Robert Harris, who wrote The Ghost, which was adapted into The Ghost Writer, which was directed by Roman Polanski. Check out reviews from The Washington Post, The New York Times, and The Guardian, and there’s a nice interview with the author at CBS’s Author Talk.

The Secret Mistress by Mary Balogh

God’s Gift To Women by Michael Baisden

Side Jobs: Stories From The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher

Djibouti by Elmore Leonard

A book about modern day pirates by the author who’s been called “The Great American Writer” by Stephen King. You can find an excerpt from Djibouti at Esquire and reviews of the novel from The New York Times and The Millions. You can check out Leonard’s blog, and also read about his admiration for Kathryn Bigelow at The Wall Street Journal.

The Death-Ray, written and illustrated by Daniel Clowes

All My Friends Are Going To Be Strangers by Larry McMurtry

In My Father’s House by E. Lynn Harris

The Wreckage by Michael Robotham

The Angel Esmerelda: Nine Stories by Don Delillo

Harlem Renaissance: Five Novels Of The 1920s, edited by Rafia Zafar

and

Harlem Renaissance: Four Novels Of The 1930s, edited by Rafia Zafar

This is a very exciting two volume set looking at classic works of fiction from an important time in literature and African American history, and featuring authors like Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Jean Toomer, and George S. Schuyler, and others. As author Junot Diaz says in his blurb on the back of the 1920s edition, “To have all these novels in one place is the best gift any reader could ever ask for.”

Escape by Barbara Delinsky

Camouflage by Bill Pronzini

Shattered by Karen Robards

Gets off to a bit of a slow start, but another fine example of romantic suspense done right by Robards. Check out an excerpt at the author’s website.

NON-FICTION:

New Men: Manliness In Early America, edited by Thomas A. Foster

This is a very intriguing historical gender study of what it was like for men, fresh from the Old World, coming into the New World, and how the definitions of being an American Man were set, based on old prejudices, manners, and mores, through the colonial periods into the revolutionary era, and shaped by a new culture, society, economy, and political system, and factors such a racism and warfare.

Lions Of Kandahar: The Story Of A Fight Against All Odds by Rusty Bradley and Kevin Maurer

Shades Of Glory: The Negro Leagues And The Story Of African-American Baseball by Lawrence D. Hogan

The Insider’s Guide To Colleges, 2012: Students On Campus Tell You What You Really Need To Know, compiled and edited by the staff of The Yale Daily News

Cooking In Other Women’s Kitchens: Domestic Workers In The South, 1865-1960 by Rebecca Sharpless

This book has been said to show the real version of what was tamefully dramatized in The Help, and that alone makes it fascinating, beyond its being a very insightful and informative read, from what a few patrons have told me. And as one review nicely pointed out, the book is very successful in its goal to “discover how African American cooks successfully functioned within a world of extremely hard work, low wages, and omnipresent racial strife.”

A Quick Start Guide To Google Adwords: Get Your Product To The Top Of Google And Reach Your Customers by Mark Harnett

A Quick Start Guide To Cloud Computing: Moving Your Business Into The Cloud by Mark I. Williams

Burn This Book: PEN Writers Speak Out On The Power Of The Word, edited by Toni Morrison

Firebrand Of Liberty: The Story Of Two Black Regiments That Changed The Course Of The Civil War by Stephen V. Ash

The Elements Of User Experience: User-Centered Design For The Web And Beyond by Jesse James Garrett

This is the second edition of the book, a nice refinement from the first edition, and helpful in taking a lot of the simple ideas for good design that you might use on the internet and bringing to other things. Check out an interview with the author from the publisher.

Border War: Fighting Over Slavery Before The Civil War by Stanley Harrold

The Triple Agent: The Al-Qaeda Mole Who Infiltrated The CIA by Joby Warrick

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Please note that books could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

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Previous New/Featured books:

02/02/11.

01/27/12.

12/27/11.

12/23/11.

And for Young Adults:

02/21/12.

02/09/12.

01/31/12.

And for Kids/Juvenile Readers:

02/28/12.

02/23/12.

02/16/12.

01/28/12.

And even more reading material.

Posted on

Some reading material from around the internet:

8 actors who look exactly the same on every movie poster.

Science fiction’s predictions for 2012.

Taco Bell has a breakfast menu?

The thrill of blaming others.

Twitter adopts country-specific censorship regime.

Human nature and the neurobiology of conflict.

How old does Google think you are?

Retailers resort to offering refunds to customers for positive reviews online.

There’s a mysterious object at the bottom of the Baltic sea.

Facebook about to go public.

An intimate look at the youth of Egypt in the ongoing revolution.

Polish lawmakers don Guy Fawkes masks to sign ACTA.

Political contributions from the financial sector have increased 700% since 1990.

A bookworm’s guide to casting The Corrections.

The new trailer for Game Of Thrones‘ second season.

The MPAA is “not comfortable” with the internet.

Shirley MacLaine has been cast the Dowager Countess’ nemesis on Downton Abbey.

The best and worst of Sundance 2012.

from here.

J.R.R. Tolkien snubbed by the 1961 Nobel jury.

The wise words of E. B. White.

The 10 most expensive books in the world.

An interview with Michael Ondaatje.

Best practices for Fair Use in libraries.

Literature’s greatest mustaches.

Visionaries from the paperback revolution.

Interesting books coming out in 2012.

Vladimir Putin has some books that he’d like you to read.

The alternate titles of famous books.

Great science fiction authors who never wrote sequels or trilogies.

Language is hardwired to be optimistic, even if people aren’t.

10 of literature’s trippiest books.

from here.

7 things you didn’t know about Joan Of Arc.

Was Leonardo Da Vinci’s famous anatomical chart actually a collaborative effort?

This is what happens when you ask Stephen Hawking for the secret to time travel.

The social networks of the Stone Age.

Volcanoes seen from space.

A truly bizarre headline: “Indonesian man arrested for kicking woman he thought was a ghost.”

How NASA kept astronauts from swearing on the moon.

The world’s giant trees are dying off rapidly.

When did Rome really fall?

An optimistic history of the next 40 years.

New and Featured DVDs for 12/30/11:

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Come and check out these and some of the other new DVDs and materials (or at least new to us) added to our library collection…

FICTION:

The Other Guys

Takers

The Box 

2009, directed by Richard Kelly. Based on a short story by the brilliant writer, Richard Matheson, who was responsible for a lot of great, classic episodes of The Twilight Zone, and in fact Matheson’s original story that this movie is based on, “Button, Button” was previously adapted into an episode of the newer version of The Twilight Zone in the 80s.  The film stars Cameron Diaz, Frank Langhella, and James Marsden, and looks a little silly, but also fun. I really enjoyed Richard Kelly’s first film, Donnie Darko, but didn’t care much for his follow up film, Southland tales, so I’m really curious how this will turn out. Check out the trailer below:

The Kids Are All Right

Hopscotch

The Conspirator

Absolutely Fabulous: Complete Series 1

Videodrome

The King’s Speech

2010, directed by Tom Hooper. This movie was the big winner at last year’s Oscars, taking home the Best Picture prize, as well as Best Director for Hooper, Best Screenplay for David Seidler, and Best Actor for Colin Firth, who plays King George VI.

Broadcast News

1987, directed by James L. Brooks. Starring Holly Hunter, Albert Brooks, and William Hurt. This is one of the best and smartest romantic comedies that I’ve ever seen and I really wish that they still made movies like this.

2001: A Space Odyssey

Joe Versus The Volcano

In The Mood For Love

2000, directed by Wong Kar-wai and starring the ever glamorous Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung. I’ve got to warn you: This is one of my favorite movies of all time and I will hype it endlessly. Set in Hong Kong in 1962, it’s the story of a man and a woman who become neighbors and friends and not long after realize that they’re spouses are having an affair together. They develop a longing and an affection for each other but refuse to give in to the same temptation that their married partners succumbed to. The plot sounds horribly sad, but it’s also beautiful, and much credit is owed to cinematographer Christopher Doyle’s visuals. You could literally take any frame from this film and hang it on your wall as art.

NON-FICTION:

Guns, Germs, And Steel

March On! The Day My Brother Martin Changed The World And More Stories About African American History

Grizzly Man

Soundtrack For A Revolution

The September Issue

Ken Burn’s Prohibition

This 2011 television documentary by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick has been highly anticipated amongst several of our library patrons so I hope that everyone gets a chance to look at it. It apparently draws very heavily from a book by Daniel Okrent called Last Call: The Rise And Fall Of Prohibition, which we also have. Check out the trailer below:

Life After People

Doomsday 2012: The End Of Days

America: The Story Of Us

* * *

Please note that DVDs could be checked out between the time they end up on the blog and when you come to check them out. If you don’t see the items you’re looking for then please come up to the front desk and we’ll put your name on the reserve list for when the item returns.

* * *

Previous New/Featured books:

12/27/11.

12/23/11.

12/19/11.

12/17/11.

12/16/11.

12/15/11.

Holiday hours.

Posted on

from here.

Our hours are going to be slightly different between now and the end of the year. These are our hours during the holiday season:

Friday, 12/16 thru Sunday, 12/18: 12 PM noon to 5 PM

Monday, 12/19 thru Thursday, 12/22: 10 AM to 5 PM

Friday, 12/23 thru Monday, 12/26: CLOSED

Tuesday, 12/27 thru Thursday, 12/29: 10 AM to 5 PM

Friday, 12/30: 12 Pm noon to 5 PM

Saturday, 12/31 thru Monday, January 2, 2012: CLOSED

And we will reopen on Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2012 at 10 AM and resume our normal hours of operation.

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